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Tag Archives: Celebrex

Pfizer Under the Microscope

I’m not, ordinarily, a fan of big companies’ annual reports. There’s way too much puffery, and far too little substance. However, I’m intrigued by an exception this year. Pfizer (NYSE: PFE), under the gun from regulators, investors and various other constituencies, has put out a remarkable little booklet called Ten Questions. In the report, the company tries to address, head-on, some of the sharpest criticisms leveled against itself and the pharmaceutical industry.

Pfizer: A Shift in the Wind

More and more, it’s looking as if the worst is over for the pharmaceutical industry — and especially for the 800-pound gorilla, Pfizer (NYSE: PFE). Last Friday, a Food & Drug Administration advisory panel voted overwhelmingly (31-1) to recommend keeping PFE’s painkiller Celebrex on the market. The same panel also voted, by a slimmer (17-13) margin, to advise the FDA to allow continued sales of Pfizer’s other controversial cox-2 painkiller, Bextra.

PFIZER: HOLD YOUR FIRE

America’s largest drug company dropped a bombshell today. Pfizer (NYSE: PFE) said an increased risk of heart problems was found in one study of cancer patients who took PFE’s painkiller Celebrex.

I think Pfizer was as shocked as anybody by these results. No other study has linked Celebrex to heart attack or stroke. Some 40 million patients have taken the drug worldwide with no statistically observable cardiovascular side effects.

WHAT'S THE TRUTH ABOUT CELEBREX?

Wall Street was wringing its hands again today over Pfizer (NYSE: PFE). A report in a Canadian newspaper, the National Post, said PFE’s pain-killing arthritis drug, Celebrex, was linked to 14 deaths. The article cited documents that Canadian health authorities use to track adverse reactions to drugs.

WHAT’S THE TRUTH ABOUT CELEBREX?

Wall Street was wringing its hands again today over Pfizer (NYSE: PFE). A report in a Canadian newspaper, the National Post, said PFE’s pain-killing arthritis drug, Celebrex, was linked to 14 deaths. The article cited documents that Canadian health authorities use to track adverse reactions to drugs.