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Tag Archives: China

September 2008 Issue & Supplement

As they say at McDonald’s, you deserve a break today–and now you’ve
got one, thanks to the recent sharp drop in oil prices. I won’t try to
tell you that lower fuel costs, alone, will cure the turmoil in world financial
markets. They won’t. But oil’s spill carries major implications for investors.
What are they? Who stands to benefit the most? Should you sell your oil
stocks right now–or buy more?
In this month’s visit, I’ll give you my straight-from-the-shoulder answers
to these crucial questions. Hint: While the drop in energy prices will
undoubtedly help put the U.S. and other economies back on a stronger
growth track, we aren’t going to be pumping $2 gasoline again anytime
soon. Lay your investment plans accordingly!

September 2008 Issue & Supplement

As they say at McDonald’s, you deserve a break today–and now you’ve
got one, thanks to the recent sharp drop in oil prices. I won’t try to
tell you that lower fuel costs, alone, will cure the turmoil in world financial
markets. They won’t. But oil’s spill carries major implications for investors.
What are they? Who stands to benefit the most? Should you sell your oil
stocks right now–or buy more?
In this month’s visit, I’ll give you my straight-from-the-shoulder answers
to these crucial questions. Hint: While the drop in energy prices will
undoubtedly help put the U.S. and other economies back on a stronger
growth track, we aren’t going to be pumping $2 gasoline again anytime
soon. Lay your investment plans accordingly!

May 2008 Issue & Supplement

These are uneasy times for investors. So why not make it just a little easier on yourself? We’re in the midst of a steep downturn for housing, and a credit crunch to boot. The economy is soft; oil prices, sky high. And on top of it all, an election looms, with the prospect of higher taxes by 2010, if not sooner.

Yet with all these (legitimate) things to worry about, it’s still possible to chart a safe — and reasonably calm — financial course through today’s troubled waters. In this month’s visit, I’ll show you how.

May 2008 Issue & Supplement

These are uneasy times for investors. So why not make it just a little easier on yourself? We’re in the midst of a steep downturn for housing, and a credit crunch to boot. The economy is soft; oil prices, sky high. And on top of it all, an election looms, with the prospect of higher taxes by 2010, if not sooner.

Yet with all these (legitimate) things to worry about, it’s still possible to chart a safe — and reasonably calm — financial course through today’s troubled waters. In this month’s visit, I’ll show you how.

April 2008 Issue

The mercury is climbing, blossoms are bursting out — so does Wall Street finally get to celebrate a springtime of its own? For eight long months now, a ferocious credit crunch, unprecedented since the Great Depression, has trapped investors in a deep freeze. Not only stocks and real estate, but even some of the (reputedly) safest bonds and money market instruments fell victim to the Arctic blast.

Happily, I’m detecting hints, here and there, of a thaw. It’s taking a lot longer than I had hoped, but we will see the end of this new Ice Age. As a balmier climate sets in, we can look forward to healthy markets again — and a return to the steady, consistent profits we enjoyed from 2003 to around mid-2007.

July 2007 Issue and Supplement

Will rising interest rates upset Wall Street’s applecart? In recent weeks, a sharp back-up in bond yields (which lifts borrowing costs for businesses and consumers alike) has given stock traders a case of the jitters. Is this the straw that will crack the bull’s spine? Or is it just another passing tremor?

I won’t keep you guessing. I don’t think this latest interest rate scare will derail the stock market’s advance for long. However, it’s also clear to me that the rate background is slowly shifting, worldwide, with major implications for stocks, bonds and a whole bunch of other investments.

In this month’s visit, I’ll show you what those implications are. Hint: It’s more crucial than ever to demand bargain prices—not just “fair” prices—for the stocks and mutual funds you buy. A value-plus-safety strategy like ours is tailor made for the new financial world we’re heading into.

November 2006 Issue & Supplement

Wall Street’s amazing bull has rejuvenated itself for another romp as stocks are putting on a fresh display of power. This month, I’ll show you how you can keep the profits flowing at a safe, healthy double-digit pace by identifying the rich veins of value still waiting to be mined. Ironically, I’m finding some of the best bargains in an area overcrowded with speculators until just a few months ago—oil and gas, including a pair of names that could leap 50%�80% in the next few years. The oil patch is also home to my favorite type of vehicle income right now—master limited partnerships. I’ll point you to my top buy among the bunch and answer some of your nagging questions about MLPs. Also look for a primer on the most attractive stocks and markets overseas. And don’t miss my Tax Savers’ Workshop in this month’s supplement.

November 2006 Issue & Supplement

Wall Street’s amazing bull has rejuvenated itself for another romp as stocks are putting on a fresh display of power. This month, I’ll show you how you can keep the profits flowing at a safe, healthy double-digit pace by identifying the rich veins of value still waiting to be mined. Ironically, I’m finding some of the best bargains in an area overcrowded with speculators until just a few months ago—oil and gas, including a pair of names that could leap 50%�80% in the next few years. The oil patch is also home to my favorite type of vehicle income right now—master limited partnerships. I’ll point you to my top buy among the bunch and answer some of your nagging questions about MLPs. Also look for a primer on the most attractive stocks and markets overseas. And don’t miss my Tax Savers’ Workshop in this month’s supplement.

China Plays the Currency Card

Well, they finally did it. Earlier today, the Chinese announced that they’ll allow their currency, the yuan, to float — or more accurately, to crawl. Initially, the yuan is being moved up a grand total of 2% (from 8.28 against the dollar to 8.11). More important, though, the link between the yuan and the greenback has been officially broken.

The Late Show

Seasonal headwinds are picking up on Wall Street. We got a snappy bounce in the stock market Tuesday as traders came back in high spirits from Independence Day. (Anytime terrorists don’t strike on a national holiday, investors seem relieved.) But today, with oil prices vaulting to a new record, the market backtracked, shedding most of Tuesday’s gains.