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Tag Archives: LOW

May 2008 Issue & Supplement

These are uneasy times for investors. So why not make it just a little easier on yourself? We’re in the midst of a steep downturn for housing, and a credit crunch to boot. The economy is soft; oil prices, sky high. And on top of it all, an election looms, with the prospect of higher taxes by 2010, if not sooner.

Yet with all these (legitimate) things to worry about, it’s still possible to chart a safe — and reasonably calm — financial course through today’s troubled waters. In this month’s visit, I’ll show you how.

May 2008 Issue & Supplement

These are uneasy times for investors. So why not make it just a little easier on yourself? We’re in the midst of a steep downturn for housing, and a credit crunch to boot. The economy is soft; oil prices, sky high. And on top of it all, an election looms, with the prospect of higher taxes by 2010, if not sooner.

Yet with all these (legitimate) things to worry about, it’s still possible to chart a safe — and reasonably calm — financial course through today’s troubled waters. In this month’s visit, I’ll show you how.

LET'S GO TO THE DEPOT

Wall Street is a funny place (and I don’t necessarily mean “humorous”). Traders can take bad news and interpret it as good. They can also look at good news and decide it’s bad. Yesterday, Home Depot (NYSE: HD) got the topsy-turvy treatment. The nation’s largest home-improvment retailer came in with a 10% earnings increase for the July quarter — 56 cents per share, two cents better than analysts had forecast.

LET’S GO TO THE DEPOT

Wall Street is a funny place (and I don’t necessarily mean “humorous”). Traders can take bad news and interpret it as good. They can also look at good news and decide it’s bad. Yesterday, Home Depot (NYSE: HD) got the topsy-turvy treatment. The nation’s largest home-improvment retailer came in with a 10% earnings increase for the July quarter — 56 cents per share, two cents better than analysts had forecast.